Money Talks News

8 Smart Ways to Save on Teen Auto Insurance

Yay! Your teen has passed that driver’s test! She or he is celebrating a big step towards adulthood, and you are excited by the break from constant chauffeur duties. But one call to your insurance agent will likely dampen your celebratory mood. That’s when you discover that it can cost upward of $6,000 a year to have a male teen added to your policy. In some cases, adding a teen of either gender costs about 227 percent more than it would to add an adult, according to Insure.com. The good news
Money Talks News

5 Tips for Helping Boomerang Kids Without Bankrupting Yourself

If you have a boomerang kid in your family, don’t despair. You’re in good company. The U.S. Census Bureau estimated that last year there were 6 million adults ages 25 to 34 living at home, according to the American Institute of CPAs. That’s 18.2 percent of all men in that age bracket (up from 14 percent in 2005) and 12.1 percent of women (up from 8 percent in 2005). College debt, a slow job market and high housing prices are some of the widely reported reasons for the trend. What’s not widely r
Money Talks News

9 Ways to Drive Down Your Auto Insurance Rates

If you’re going to drive a car, you need insurance. There’s really no way around that. But you have more control over your auto insurance rates than you likely think. And that can translate into big savings. You know things like traffic tickets are going to raise your insurance rates. But you may not know that many insurers factor in everything from how many miles a year you drive to where you live in determining your rate. Consider these ideas to get quality coverage at reasonable rates: Tha
Money Talks News

4 Ways Home Equity Loans Can Sink Your Finances

Remember the real estate boom-and-bust that left many homeowners in foreclosure? Whew, glad that’s behind us, right? If you’re like some homeowners, you’ve greeted the U.S. economic upturn by seeking out a home equity loan — basically, a type of second mortgage, but not to be confused with a home equity line of credit, or HELOC. What’s not to like about a lump sum of cash, right? Well, one thing could be that you’re unwittingly setting yourself up to fail and, yes, face foreclosure. Still, hom
Reader's Digest

Buying a Car Online: What You Need to Know

The traditional car buying process deflates even the most enthusiastic buyer. Spending hours walking around a dealers' lot, negotiating with the salesperson, and then reviewing all the facts and figures with the Finance and Insurance (F&I) manager generally takes hours of time and stressful conversation. No wonder that a report by Accenture found that 53 percent of car buyers would consider buying a car online. There are secrets to all auto transactions, of course. But online auto buying rules a
Money Talks News

Extreme Financial Makeover: 30 Moves in 30 Days

Every January, we promise we’re going to get our financial houses in order. And every December, we face up to the reality that we didn’t quite make it happen. There are plenty of reasons we fail on our financial resolutions, including the biggie: too little time. So this year, try a new approach. Divide what seems like a monumental job into bite-sized tasks and tackle one of them each day for one month. Ready to get started? Let’s do it!
Fortune Magazine

Serena Williams has taken breaks in her career—and so can you

When Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer announced plans to work through her current pregnancy—with twins, no less!—some women saw it as confirmation that non-stop "leaning in" is the only the only viable path to high-level success. But here's another top-performing female role model to consider: Serena Williams. Williams has been dominating headlines during this year's US Open and stoking excitement as she makes a run at a calendar-year Grand Slam (winning all four major tournaments in a single year)—a f
Today.com

Should you get married? Not before talking about this

Mike Lynch watched his just-married best friend tear up as he accepted an envelope from his new father-in-law. The envelope contained the student loan paperwork for his new wife’s debt. While the gesture was tinged with humor, Lynch, vice president of strategic markets at money management firm Hartford Funds, thought it was a smart move. “When you’re married, you’re both responsible for debts,” he said. “Anytime you add someone to the family — a partner, children — things change and it’s impor